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Citation

About IEEE Style

IEEE citation style is the citation style (or documentation style) created by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE). It is used in all IEEE publications as well as by many scholars in the electronics, engineering, telecommunications, computer science, and information technology fields. 

In text citation

One thing that makes IEEE citation style different from others you many have used is that instead of using the authors' names to create an in-text citation, each citation must be noted within the text through a number enclosed in square brackets. Once a source has been cited, the same number is used in all subsequent references in the report or paper.

The preferred method to cite more than one source at a time is to list each reference in its own brackets, then separate with a comma or dash:

[1], [3], [7] or [1]-[5]

At the end of your paper or report citation information for each numbered in-text citation should be organized in the order they appear in the paper, not alphabetical order.

General format:

References

[# of citation] Author's first initial and last name. Title of Longer Work or "Title of Shorter Work." Publisher: Publisher location, year. [type of work] URL, DOI, or database. Available: website, DOI, or database name. [Date Accessed].

I'm citing a...

  1. Author(s) In the bibliography, list the the author(s)' names first initial first and then last name
  2. "Title of the Article" Use sentence capitalization and quotation marks.
  3. Title of the Journal Use title capitalization and italicize.
  4. Volume Include the volume number of the journal.
  5. Issue Number If there are multiple issues in a journal, include a comma , after the volume and no.#.
  6. Year. Include the year the article was published in parentheses, followed by a period
  7. [Material type]. for example: Online Serial, E-book, Online (for websites).
  8. Available:  This is where you found this resource, for example the DOI, database name, or web address. Follow this with a period.
  9. [Accessed date month. day, year]. This is the date you accessed the resource
Reference
[1]    A. Altun, “Understanding hypertext in the context of reading on the web: Language      learners’ experience,” Current Issues in Education, vol. 6, no. 12, July, 2005. Available:      ProQuest, http://www.umi.com/proquest/. [Accessed Dec. 2, 2007].
  1. Author(s) In the bibliography, list the the author(s)' names first initial first and then last name
  2. "Title of the Article" Use sentence capitalization and quotation marks.
  3. Title of the Newspaper, Use title capitalization and italicize.
  4. Paragraph, Include what paragraph of the article the information you;re citing can be found nin
  5. Date. Include the date the article was published in parentheses, followed by a period
  6. [Material type].for news a news article you accessed online this should be [Online]
  7. Available:  This is the web address where someone can find this article. Follow this with a period.
  8. [Accessed date month. day, year]. This is the date you accessed the resource
Reference
[2] C. Wilson-Clark, “Computers ranked as key literacy,” The Atlanta Journal Constitution, para. 3, March 29, 2007. [Online], Available: http://www.thewest.com.au. [Accessed Sept. 18, 2007]..
  1. Author(s), In the bibliography, list the the author(s)' names first initial first and then last name
  2. Title of the Book Use title capitalization and italics.
  3. Place of publication: List the state (if from the U.S.) or the country associated with the published, then a colon :.
  4. Publisher List the publisher of the book. This is usually listed on the copyright page.
  5. Year Include the year in which the book you are citing was published.
  6. Reference
    [3] W. K. Chen, Linear Networks and Systems. Belmont, CA: WadsworthPress, 2003.
  1. Author(s), In the bibliography, list the the author(s)' names first initial first and then last name
  2. "Title of the Chapter or Essay" Use sentence capitalization and quotation marks.
  3. Title of the Book, Include "in" then the the book in headline capitalization and italics.
  4. Name of the Editor(s) Include the editor's first initial and last name. Follow with a comma and "Eds"
  5. Place of publication: List the state (if from the U.S.) or the country associated with the published, then a colon :.
  6. Publisher List the publisher of the book. This is usually listed on the copyright page.
  7. Year Include the year in which the book you are citing was published.
  8. Page numbers Include the page range of the chapter you are citing in the notes only.
Reference
[4] E. D. Lipson and B. D. Horwitz, “Photosensory reception and transduction,” in Sensory Receptors and Signal Transduction, J. L. Spudich and B. H. Satir, Eds. New York: Wiley-Liss, 2001, pp-1-64.
  1. AuthorThis can be the organization who created and maintains this website, or the individual author listed first initial followed by last name.
  2. Title of the webpage This is the title of the specific page you are citing.
  3. Name of the Website The title of the website where you found this webpage. Use title case and italics. Follow with [Online].
  4. URL.
  5. [Date] After Available: list the date you accessed the web page in brackets
Reference
[5] European Telecommunications Standards Institute, “Digital Video Broadcasting (DVB): Implementation guide for DVB terrestrial services; transmission aspects,” European Telecommunications Standards Institute, ETSI-TR-101, 2007. [Online]. Available: http://www.etsi.org. [Accessed: Nov. 12, 2007]..

Citing a letter, photograph, text document, graphic material, or ephemera? Consult the Gerth Archives Chicago Citation Guide for Archival Materials.

Formatting Your Paper

How do I make a hanging indent in Word?

1. Highlight the citaiton with your cursor. 

2. Right click. 

3. Select Paragraph.

4. Under Indentation, select Special and Hanging.

Animated gif of creating a hanging indent in Word. Highlight the full citation. Right click. Go to Paragraph. To to the Special drop down menu, select Hanging. Select Okay.

How can I save time formatting my paper? 

Microsoft Word and Google Docs have a Format Painter tool that will copy and apply basic formatting to any text! 

1. Highlight the formatting you want to apply. 

2. Select Format Painter

3. Highlight the text you want to change. 

Note: If using the Format Painter on the Reference List, you'll need to go back and add italics. 

Animated gif of using the Format Painter tool in Word.