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University Authors Collection

Highlighting the scholarly and creative contributions of our CSUDH Community

University Authors Collection

About the Collection

The University Authors Collection at the CSUDH University Library proudly recognizes the scholarly and creative contributions of our campus community. The collection includes published materials that were written, edited, or created by CSUDH affiliates during their time with the campus, including (but not limited to) books and book chapters.

The physical collection is available to view and checkout at the shelves immediately behind the Research Help Desk, on Library 2nd floor South (see map). Select works are available to view online at https://libguides.csudh.edu/universityauthors.

Materials Included

The collection is not meant to be comprehensive, but rather to represent and showcase the breadth of scholarly and creative activities at CSUDH. As such, textbooks, vanity press, and self-published textual works shall typically not be included. The Collection Services Coordinator in consultation with library administration and colleagues is responsible for identifying and selecting the collection content.

Are you a campus author who would like to be considered for inclusion in the collection? Contact Wendy Vermeer (wvermeer@csudh.edu, 310.243.3134).

Featured Works

Ricoeur's Hermeneutics of Religion

Brian Gregor
Assistant Professor of Philosophy

In this important new book, Brian Gregor draws on the full scope of Paul Ricoeur's writings to lay out the essential features of his philosophical interpretation of religion, from his earliest to his last work. The result is a study of Ricoeur that is both sympathetic and critical, provocative and original, inviting the reader into a deeper engagement with Ricoeur's philosophical interpretation of religion.

Popular Culture in Asia

Lorna Fitzsimmons
Humanities Professor

In this edited collection, Fitzsimmons, Lent, and other scholars examine popular culture in Asia through studies of film, music, architecture, television, and computer-mediated communication in China, Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, the Philippines, Malaysia, and Singapore, addressing three central themes: urban modernities; modernity, celebrity, and fan culture; and memory and modernity.

Faust Adaptations from Marlowe to Aboudoma and Markland

Lorna Fitzsimmons
Humanities Professor

In this edited collection, Fitzsimmons introduces a comparative cultural studies approach to the ubiquitous legend of Faust and his infernal dealings. Including readings of English, German, Dutch, and Egyptian adaptations ranging from the early modern period to the contemporary moment, this collection emphasizes the interdisciplinary and transcultural tenets of comparative cultural studies.

The Prehistory of Home

Jerry Moore
Anthropology Professor

2014 Book Award from the Society of American Archaeology (SAA)
Many animals build shelters, but only humans build homes. No other species creates such a variety of dwellings. Drawing examples from across the archaeological record and around the world, archaeologist Jerry D. Moore recounts the cultural development of the uniquely human imperative to maintain domestic dwellings.

The Grind: Black women and survival in the inner city

Alexis McCurn
Associate Professor of Sociology

McCurn draws on nearly two years of naturalistic field research among adolescents and adults in Oakland, California to provide an ethnographic account of how black women accomplish the routine tasks necessary for basic survival in poor inner-city neighborhoods and how the intersections of race, gender, and class shape how black women interact with others in public.

From Smartphones to Social Media: How technology affects our brains and behavior

Mark Carrier
Psychology Professor

Carrier examines how today's technology of smartphones, computers, and the internet, shapes our physical health, cognitive and psychological development, and interactions with one another and the world around us.  He examines both the positive and negative effects of technology on our physical, psychological, and social health and provides real-world examples through case studies.

The Distracted Mind: Ancient brains in a high-tech world

Larry Rosen
Psychology Professor

Gazzaley and Rosen explain why our brains aren't built for multitasking, and suggest better ways to live in a high-tech world without giving up our modern technology since technology-related distractions and interruptions collide with our goal-setting abilities. Instead of suggesting that we give up our devices, the authors conclude that we should use them in a more balanced way.

The Wiley Handbook of Psychology, Technology and Society

Larry Rosen
Psychology Professor

Nancy A. Cheever
Professor and Chair of Communication

Mark Carrier
Psychology Professor

Edited by three of the world's leading authorities on the psychology of technology, this new handbook provides a thoughtful and evidence-driven examination of contemporary technology's impact on society and human behavior.

Transformative Civic Engagement Through Community Organizing

Maria Avila
Assistant Professor of Social Work

Avila presents how her personal experience as a teenager working in a factory in Ciudad Juarez led her to community organizing. She has since applied the its distinctive practices of community organizing to civic engagement in higher education, demonstrating how this can help create a culture that values and rewards civically engaged scholarship and advance higher education's public, democratic mission.

Southeast Asian Diaspora in the United States

Susan Needham
Anthropology Professor

Needham's chapter "Acting out: Thai American Buddhists encounters with white privilege and white supremacy" contributes to critical ethnic and Asian American studies discourses on Southeast Asian American subjectivities, communities, histories, creativities, and cultural expressions.

The Dark Side of Leadership: Identifying and overcoming unethical practice in organizations

Anthony Normore
Professor of Graduate Education

This edited collection explores the dark side of leadership-those areas of unethical, unlawful and unconscionable practice in which some organizational leaders engage. The authors identify organizational issues and problems while also offering solutions to improve leadership practices that prevent interpersonal, organizational, and institutional toxicity.

Foundations of Educational Leadership: Developing excellent and equitable schools

Anthony Normore
Professor of Graduate Education

Brooks and Normore cover traditional concepts of educational leadership such as culture, instructional leadership, professional ethics, and politics, and introduce new conversations around spirituality, holistic health, and information leadership. The authors emphasize how a framework of learning, literacy, leadership, and reflection is critical to the preparation and practice of educational leaders.

Market Encounters: Consumer cultures in twentieth-century Ghana

Bianca Murillo
Associate Professor of History

Fusing economic and business history with social and cultural history, Murillo traces the evolution of consumerism in the colonial Gold Coast and independent Ghana from the late nineteenth century through to the political turmoil of the 1970s. The result is a keen look at colonial capitalism in all of its intricacies, legacies, and contradictions, including its entanglement with gender and race.

Gender Roles in Immigrant Families

Kathy Pinto
Sociology Professor

Pinto and Coltrane's chapter "Social Support in the Lives of Sudanese Refugee and Russian Immigrant Fathers in Canada" contributes to this collection of ecological and acculturation frameworks for understanding experiences of immigrant populations, which places gender at the forefront of parental roles, parent-child relationships, and child outcomes.

Essentials of Terrorism

Gus Martin
Public Administration Professor

Martin introduces the history, causes, and definitions of terrorism, as well as terrorist environments (domestic, international, religious, etc.), tactics, targets, and counterterrorism. The newest edition includes topics like homeland security, gender-selective terrorism, the Internet and terrorism, and media coverage of terrorism.

Critical Library Pedagogy Handbook

Carolyn Caffrey Gardner
Information Literacy Coordinator

In her chapter, "At Odds with Assessment: Being a Critical Educator within the Academy," CSUDH librarian Carolyn Caffrey Gardner critically examines assessment of information literacy in higher education. This two volume handbook makes critical pedagogy more accessible for library educators, examining both theory and practice to help the busy practitioner explore various aspects of teaching for social justice.

Cross-Cultural Collaboration and Leadership in Modern Organizations

Nancy Erbe
Professor of Negotiation, Conflict Resolution and Peacebuilding (NCRP)

Anthony Normore
Professor of Graduate Education

This collection edited by Erbe and Normore provides an interdisciplinary analysis of how organizations can responsibly embrace complex problem-solving and creative decision making with practical tools and critical guidelines. Additional authors from CSUDH include Margaret Manning, Giuseppina Wright, Kenneth Roth, Kirti Celly, and Charles Henry.

No Permanent Waves: Recasting histories of U.S. feminism

Marisela Chávez
Associate Professor and Chair of Chicana/Chicano Studies

Chávez's chapter "Unsettling 'third wave feminism': feminist waves, intersectionality, and identity politics in retrospect" contributes to ongoing debates over the utility of the "wave" metaphor for capturing the complex history of women's rights. Essays in this collection question suggest models for reimagining these histories from radio waves to hip-hop.

Heidegger, Reproductive Technology, and the Motherless Age

Dana Belu
Professor of Philosophy & Coordinator Women's Studies Program

Belu combines Heidegger's The Question Concerning Technology with feminist phenomenology in order to make sense of the increased technicization of women's reproductive bodies during conception, pregnancy, and birth. Belu's analysis of assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs) and its relationship to constructed motherness contribute to defining our epoch as the "Motherless Age."

An Introduction to Popular Culture in the US: People, politics, and power

Jenn Brandt
Associate Professor of Women's Studies

Brandt and Clare broaden the understanding of culture beyond a focus solely on media texts, taking an interdisciplinary approach to analyze American culture, its rituals, beliefs, and the objects that shape its existence. This approach to the field of study explores all matters of culture in a way that is accessible and relevant to individuals in and outside of the classroom.

Inclusive Practices and Social Justice Leadership for Special Populations in Urban Settings

Anthony Normore
Professor of Graduate Education

Kate Esposito
Education Professor

This collection edited by Noremore and Esposito draws from the authors’ extensive experience in educational research and practice, and their commitment to social justice and inclusion as they urge readers to examine how educational policies affect English language learners, gender discrimination, the foster care system, and LGBT youth.

On Being Maya and Getting By: Heritage politics and community development in Yucatán

Sarah Taylor
Assistant Professor of Anthropology

Taylor's ethnographic study of Ek'Balams of the Yucatán Peninsula is a rich description of how one community is actively negotiating with tourism and development that calls for a more complex analysis of how rural villages are connected to greater urban, national, and global forces. Taylor provides insights into how the ideological conflicts surrounding economic development play out in the negotiations between internal community politics and external social actors.

La influencia experimentada desde la nueva periferia: El caso de la literatura española post-imperial

Benito Gómez
Modern Languages Professor

In this Spanish-language book, Gómez makes a case for post-imperial Spanish literature in the way it combines traditional elements with modern, avant-garde influences, and critically examines authors like José Cadalso, Ramón de la Cruz, Emilia Pardo Bazán, Pío Baroja, Azorín and Rafael Alberti.

Incidence of Travel: Recent journeys in ancient South America

Jerry Moore
Anthropology Professor

Moore draws on his personal experiences and historical and archaeological studies throughout South America to explore and understand the ways traditional peoples created cultural landscapes in the region. Using new narrative structures, Moore introduces readers to archaeological sites and remains, describing what it is like to be in the field and reflecting on what these places might have been like in the past. 

California State University, Dominguez Hills

Greg Williams
Director of the Gerth Archives & Special Collections

Williams traces the history of CSUDH from its charter in 1960 as a liberal arts college serving baby booms in LA's South Bay Region to the 21st century. Celebrating its 50th anniversary in 2010, classes began in 1965 in a bank building and the next year moved to Dominguez Hills. By the end of the 1970s, the campus grew by several thousand students and 10 architecturally unique buildings. 

Sex, Sexuality, Law, and (In)Justice

Jennifer Sumner
Associate Professor of Public Administration

In this edited collection, Sumner, Fradella, and other authors explore a wide range of legal issues associated with sexuality, gender, reproduction, and identity. Synthesizing the literature across a wide breadth of perspectives to critically examine the social control of sex, gender, and sexuality across history, this book can be used to teach law, psychology, criminal justice, sociology, philosophy, history, and, where relevant, biology. 

Education-Based Incarceration and Recidivism

Anthony Normore
Professor of Graduate Education

This edited volume examines the needs and challenges of society's disenfranchised jail populations. The intended audience for this book includes academics, national and international law enforcement agencies, and correctional institutions interested in establishing and assessing the effectiveness of an education-based incarceration program, but can also be used by educators and students. 

Climates, Landscapes, and Civilizations

Ashish Sinha
Professor of Earth and Climate Sciences

In his chapter "An Abrupt Shift in the Indian Monsoon 4000 Years Ago," Sinha and co-authors contribute to a collection of studies on the history of complex interrelationships between humans and their environment by integrating Earth science with archaeology and anthropology. Taking an interdisciplinary approach to the critical topic of climate change, this book appeals to a wide readership among scientists, scholars, and the public at large.

The People of Palomas: Neandertals from the Sima de las Palomas del Cabezo Gordo, southeastern Spain

Sarah Lacy
Anthropology Professor

In her chapter "The Palomas postcrania," Lacy and co-authors contribute to scholarship around the Neandertal site of the Sima de las Palomas del Cabezo Gordo, located in Murcia in southeastern Spain in the  first detailed description and analysis of this human fossil assemblage. This noteworthy site has yielded the remains of at least 17 Neandertals, adding appreciable breadth to the available data.

Cambodians in Long Beach

Susan Needham
Anthropology Professor

Needham and Quintiliani trace the journey of early Cambodian immigrants to Long Beach after the 1975 U.S. military withdrawal from Southeast Asia. Today, Long Beach contains the largest concentration of Cambodians in the US and has become the political, economic, and cultural center of activities influencing Cambodian culture in the diaspora as well as Cambodia itself.

Making Grateful Kids: The science of building character

Giacomo Bono
Assistant Professor of Psychology

Bono and Froh share findings and real-life stories from adults and youth to show parents, teachers, mentors, and kids how to achieve greater life satisfaction through gratitude. Not only does the purposeful practice of gratitude increase their happiness, but the research indicates that grateful kids also report more self-discipline, fulfilling relationships, and engagement with their schools and communities. 

Health Promotion at the Community Level

Abel Arvizu Whittemore
Health Science Lecturer

In his chapter "Health and health promotion in Latin America: A social change perspective," Whittemore and  co-author Buelow contribute to a collection of international experiences and expertise about diverse health promotion and point out areas needing adjustment in community implementation.

The Passion of Infinity: Kierkegaard, Aristotle and the rebirth of tragedy

Daniel Greenspan
Philosophy Lecturer

Greenspan analyzes Aristotle and tragedy in this volume of the Kierkegaard Studies Monograph Series.

Mentoring and diversity: Tips for students and professionals for developing and maintaining a diverse scientific community

Thomas Landefeld
Professor of Biology

Landefeld provides tips and guidance to students and professionals navigating the STEM fields. Information and advice is given from the pre-college stage through graduate school and into navigating a science career. The volume pays particular attention to helping underrepresented groups thrive in science disciplines.

Featured Works

Ricoeur's Hermeneutics of Religion

Brian Gregor
Assistant Professor of Philosophy

In this important new book, Brian Gregor draws on the full scope of Paul Ricoeur's writings to lay out the essential features of his philosophical interpretation of religion, from his earliest to his last work. The result is a study of Ricoeur that is both sympathetic and critical, provocative and original, inviting the reader into a deeper engagement with Ricoeur's philosophical interpretation of religion.

Popular Culture in Asia

Lorna Fitzsimmons
Humanities Professor

In this edited collection, Fitzsimmons, Lent, and other scholars examine popular culture in Asia through studies of film, music, architecture, television, and computer-mediated communication in China, Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, the Philippines, Malaysia, and Singapore, addressing three central themes: urban modernities; modernity, celebrity, and fan culture; and memory and modernity.

Faust Adaptations from Marlowe to Aboudoma and Markland

Lorna Fitzsimmons
Humanities Professor

In this edited collection, Fitzsimmons introduces a comparative cultural studies approach to the ubiquitous legend of Faust and his infernal dealings. Including readings of English, German, Dutch, and Egyptian adaptations ranging from the early modern period to the contemporary moment, this collection emphasizes the interdisciplinary and transcultural tenets of comparative cultural studies.

The Prehistory of Home

Jerry Moore
Anthropology Professor

2014 Book Award from the Society of American Archaeology (SAA)
Many animals build shelters, but only humans build homes. No other species creates such a variety of dwellings. Drawing examples from across the archaeological record and around the world, archaeologist Jerry D. Moore recounts the cultural development of the uniquely human imperative to maintain domestic dwellings.

The Grind: Black women and survival in the inner city

Alexis McCurn
Associate Professor of Sociology

McCurn draws on nearly two years of naturalistic field research among adolescents and adults in Oakland, California to provide an ethnographic account of how black women accomplish the routine tasks necessary for basic survival in poor inner-city neighborhoods and how the intersections of race, gender, and class shape how black women interact with others in public.

From Smartphones to Social Media: How technology affects our brains and behavior

Mark Carrier
Psychology Professor

Carrier examines how today's technology of smartphones, computers, and the internet, shapes our physical health, cognitive and psychological development, and interactions with one another and the world around us.  He examines both the positive and negative effects of technology on our physical, psychological, and social health and provides real-world examples through case studies.

The Distracted Mind: Ancient brains in a high-tech world

Larry Rosen
Psychology Professor

Gazzaley and Rosen explain why our brains aren't built for multitasking, and suggest better ways to live in a high-tech world without giving up our modern technology since technology-related distractions and interruptions collide with our goal-setting abilities. Instead of suggesting that we give up our devices, the authors conclude that we should use them in a more balanced way.

The Wiley Handbook of Psychology, Technology and Society

Larry Rosen
Psychology Professor

Nancy A. Cheever
Professor and Chair of Communication

Mark Carrier
Psychology Professor

Edited by three of the world's leading authorities on the psychology of technology, this new handbook provides a thoughtful and evidence-driven examination of contemporary technology's impact on society and human behavior.

Transformative Civic Engagement Through Community Organizing

Maria Avila
Assistant Professor of Social Work

Avila presents how her personal experience as a teenager working in a factory in Ciudad Juarez led her to community organizing. She has since applied the its distinctive practices of community organizing to civic engagement in higher education, demonstrating how this can help create a culture that values and rewards civically engaged scholarship and advance higher education's public, democratic mission.

Southeast Asian Diaspora in the United States

Susan Needham
Anthropology Professor

Needham's chapter "Acting out: Thai American Buddhists encounters with white privilege and white supremacy" contributes to critical ethnic and Asian American studies discourses on Southeast Asian American subjectivities, communities, histories, creativities, and cultural expressions.

The Dark Side of Leadership: Identifying and overcoming unethical practice in organizations

Anthony Normore
Professor of Graduate Education

This edited collection explores the dark side of leadership-those areas of unethical, unlawful and unconscionable practice in which some organizational leaders engage. The authors identify organizational issues and problems while also offering solutions to improve leadership practices that prevent interpersonal, organizational, and institutional toxicity.

Foundations of Educational Leadership: Developing excellent and equitable schools

Anthony Normore
Professor of Graduate Education

Brooks and Normore cover traditional concepts of educational leadership such as culture, instructional leadership, professional ethics, and politics, and introduce new conversations around spirituality, holistic health, and information leadership. The authors emphasize how a framework of learning, literacy, leadership, and reflection is critical to the preparation and practice of educational leaders.

Market Encounters: Consumer cultures in twentieth-century Ghana

Bianca Murillo
Associate Professor of History

Fusing economic and business history with social and cultural history, Murillo traces the evolution of consumerism in the colonial Gold Coast and independent Ghana from the late nineteenth century through to the political turmoil of the 1970s. The result is a keen look at colonial capitalism in all of its intricacies, legacies, and contradictions, including its entanglement with gender and race.

Gender Roles in Immigrant Families

Kathy Pinto
Sociology Professor

Pinto and Coltrane's chapter "Social Support in the Lives of Sudanese Refugee and Russian Immigrant Fathers in Canada" contributes to this collection of ecological and acculturation frameworks for understanding experiences of immigrant populations, which places gender at the forefront of parental roles, parent-child relationships, and child outcomes.

Essentials of Terrorism

Gus Martin
Public Administration Professor

Martin introduces the history, causes, and definitions of terrorism, as well as terrorist environments (domestic, international, religious, etc.), tactics, targets, and counterterrorism. The newest edition includes topics like homeland security, gender-selective terrorism, the Internet and terrorism, and media coverage of terrorism.

Critical Library Pedagogy Handbook

Carolyn Caffrey Gardner
Information Literacy Coordinator

In her chapter, "What standards do and what they don't," CSUDH librarian Carolyn Caffrey Gardner critically examines assessment of standards for information literacy in higher education. This two volume handbook makes critical pedagogy more accessible for library educators, examining both theory and practice to help the busy practitioner explore various aspects of teaching for social justice.

Cross-Cultural Collaboration and Leadership in Modern Organizations

Nancy Erbe
Professor of Negotiation, Conflict Resolution and Peacebuilding (NCRP)

Anthony Normore
Professor of Graduate Education

This collection edited by Erbe and Normore provides an interdisciplinary analysis of how organizations can responsibly embrace complex problem-solving and creative decision making with practical tools and critical guidelines. Additional authors from CSUDH include Margaret Manning, Giuseppina Wright, Kenneth Roth, Kirti Celly, and Charles Henry.

No Permanent Waves: Recasting histories of U.S. feminism

Marisela Chávez
Associate Professor and Chair of Chicana/Chicano Studies

Chávez's chapter "Unsettling 'third wave feminism': feminist waves, intersectionality, and identity politics in retrospect" contributes to ongoing debates over the utility of the "wave" metaphor for capturing the complex history of women's rights. Essays in this collection question suggest models for reimagining these histories from radio waves to hip-hop.

Heidegger, Reproductive Technology, and the Motherless Age

Dana Belu
Professor of Philosophy & Coordinator Women's Studies Program

Belu combines Heidegger's The Question Concerning Technology with feminist phenomenology in order to make sense of the increased technicization of women's reproductive bodies during conception, pregnancy, and birth. Belu's analysis of assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs) and its relationship to constructed motherness contribute to defining our epoch as the "Motherless Age."

An Introduction to Popular Culture in the US: People, politics, and power

Jenn Brandt
Associate Professor of Women's Studies

Brandt and Clare broaden the understanding of culture beyond a focus solely on media texts, taking an interdisciplinary approach to analyze American culture, its rituals, beliefs, and the objects that shape its existence. This approach to the field of study explores all matters of culture in a way that is accessible and relevant to individuals in and outside of the classroom.

Inclusive Practices and Social Justice Leadership for Special Populations in Urban Settings

Anthony Normore
Professor of Graduate Education

Kate Esposito
Education Professor

This collection edited by Noremore and Esposito draws from the authors’ extensive experience in educational research and practice, and their commitment to social justice and inclusion as they urge readers to examine how educational policies affect English language learners, gender discrimination, the foster care system, and LGBT youth.

On Being Maya and Getting By: Heritage politics and community development in Yucatán

Sarah Taylor
Assistant Professor of Anthropology

Taylor's ethnographic study of Ek'Balams of the Yucatán Peninsula is a rich description of how one community is actively negotiating with tourism and development that calls for a more complex analysis of how rural villages are connected to greater urban, national, and global forces. Taylor provides insights into how the ideological conflicts surrounding economic development play out in the negotiations between internal community politics and external social actors.

La influencia experimentada desde la nueva periferia: El caso de la literatura española post-imperial

Benito Gómez
Modern Languages Professor

In this Spanish-language book, Gómez makes a case for post-imperial Spanish literature in the way it combines traditional elements with modern, avant-garde influences, and critically examines authors like José Cadalso, Ramón de la Cruz, Emilia Pardo Bazán, Pío Baroja, Azorín and Rafael Alberti.

Incidence of Travel: Recent journeys in ancient South America

Jerry Moore
Anthropology Professor

Moore draws on his personal experiences and historical and archaeological studies throughout South America to explore and understand the ways traditional peoples created cultural landscapes in the region. Using new narrative structures, Moore introduces readers to archaeological sites and remains, describing what it is like to be in the field and reflecting on what these places might have been like in the past. 

California State University, Dominguez Hills

Greg Williams
Director of the Gerth Archives & Special Collections

Williams traces the history of CSUDH from its charter in 1960 as a liberal arts college serving baby booms in LA's South Bay Region to the 21st century. Celebrating its 50th anniversary in 2010, classes began in 1965 in a bank building and the next year moved to Dominguez Hills. By the end of the 1970s, the campus grew by several thousand students and 10 architecturally unique buildings. 

Sex, Sexuality, Law, and (In)Justice

Jennifer Sumner
Associate Professor of Public Administration

In this edited collection, Sumner, Fradella, and other authors explore a wide range of legal issues associated with sexuality, gender, reproduction, and identity. Synthesizing the literature across a wide breadth of perspectives to critically examine the social control of sex, gender, and sexuality across history, this book can be used to teach law, psychology, criminal justice, sociology, philosophy, history, and, where relevant, biology. 

Education-Based Incarceration and Recidivism

Anthony Normore
Professor of Graduate Education

This edited volume examines the needs and challenges of society's disenfranchised jail populations. The intended audience for this book includes academics, national and international law enforcement agencies, and correctional institutions interested in establishing and assessing the effectiveness of an education-based incarceration program, but can also be used by educators and students. 

Climates, Landscapes, and Civilizations

Ashish Sinha
Professor of Earth and Climate Sciences

In his chapter "An Abrupt Shift in the Indian Monsoon 4000 Years Ago," Sinha and co-authors contribute to a collection of studies on the history of complex interrelationships between humans and their environment by integrating Earth science with archaeology and anthropology. Taking an interdisciplinary approach to the critical topic of climate change, this book appeals to a wide readership among scientists, scholars, and the public at large.

The People of Palomas: Neandertals from the Sima de las Palomas del Cabezo Gordo, southeastern Spain

Sarah Lacy
Anthropology Professor

In her chapter "The Palomas postcrania," Lacy and co-authors contribute to scholarship around the Neandertal site of the Sima de las Palomas del Cabezo Gordo, located in Murcia in southeastern Spain in the  first detailed description and analysis of this human fossil assemblage. This noteworthy site has yielded the remains of at least 17 Neandertals, adding appreciable breadth to the available data.

Cambodians in Long Beach

Susan Needham
Anthropology Professor

Needham and Quintiliani trace the journey of early Cambodian immigrants to Long Beach after the 1975 U.S. military withdrawal from Southeast Asia. Today, Long Beach contains the largest concentration of Cambodians in the US and has become the political, economic, and cultural center of activities influencing Cambodian culture in the diaspora as well as Cambodia itself.

Making Grateful Kids: The science of building character

Giacomo Bono
Assistant Professor of Psychology

Bono and Froh share findings and real-life stories from adults and youth to show parents, teachers, mentors, and kids how to achieve greater life satisfaction through gratitude. Not only does the purposeful practice of gratitude increase their happiness, but the research indicates that grateful kids also report more self-discipline, fulfilling relationships, and engagement with their schools and communities. 

Health Promotion at the Community Level

Abel Arvizu Whittemore
Health Science Lecturer

In his chapter "Health and health promotion in Latin America: A social change perspective," Whittemore and  co-author Buelow contribute to a collection of international experiences and expertise about diverse health promotion and point out areas needing adjustment in community implementation.